Topic: The Suffrage Project - Linwood Cemetery

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A description of the Friends of Linwood Cemetery's Suffrage Project which sets out to identify those who signed the Suffrage Petition of 1893 and are buried in Linwood Cemetery, Christchurch, NZ

In 2012, the Trust had help from Olivia Kant, an intern from Canterbury University.  We set her on a project to identify those buried in Linwood Cemetery who signed the Suffrage Petition of 1893.  At that time, it had just been made available on the internet.  The petition has approximately 24,000 signatures from women aged 21 years or older of which 4432 were from Canterbury.  Some men also signed the petition

"Suffrage" and "franchisement" are terms used to mean the right to vote in political elections. "Emancipation" means being set free from legal, social, or political restrictions.  This is a key principal of a democratic society where one has a right to form and challenge decisions made on your behalf by elected representatives and also to become an elected representative.  In New Zealand, women had to campaign to have the right to vote in parliamentary elections, which was only granted in 1893 - over 40 years since the First Four Ships arrived in Lyttelton.

By painstakingly cross referencing each Cantabrian on the petition with the CCC Database for Linwood Cemetery, Olivia was able to identfy 250 people (approx 5% of those from Canterbury on the petition) as being buried in Linwood Cemetery.  She was unsure of a further 390 women who would need deeper investigation due to the vagary of their name.  It was common practice up until maybe the 1990s, for a married woman to be known by her husband's name and call herself by that name as well - so, for example Kate SHEPPARD, would be known as Mrs Walter SHEPPARD, or, in writing, Mrs W. SHEPPARD.  This often makes identifying women, even in labelled photographs or documents, a challenge.

If your Linwood Cemetery ancestor signed the suffrage petition, please contact linwoodcemeterynz@gmail.com so we can ensure they are acknowledged on this list.

FAMILY NAME First Name(s) Died Year Block Block ext Plot Plot ext
ALEXANDER Amelia
33
51
ALLWRIGHT Grace
7
2
AMOS Ellen 1925 20
84
AMOS Ellen Alice May 1938 29
300
ATKINSON Eliza Everitt 1922 1
18
AUSTIN Eliza 1896 31 A 62
BANNISTER Elizabeth 1900 32
26
BARRELL Ophelia Violet 1946 36
152
BARTLEY Mary Jane 1913 24
249
BASSETT Sarah 1912 28
223
BATCHELOR Mary (M) 1897 10
34
BEARE Anne Martha (A) 1896 28
275
BEATTIE Anne Jane (Ann) 1918 36 A 158
BENNETTS Emma 1931 36
436
BERRY Sarah Hannah 1915 28
428
BIRKS Mary Elizabeth 1929 36 A 78
BISHOP Amelia 1909 32
293
BLAKE Louisa 1901 13
30
BLAKE Sarah 1899 27
199
BOOT Sarah Anne 1933 29
160
BOSS Sarah Jane 1915 46
76
BOUNDY Mary Ann 1919 33
508
BOWLEY Eleanor (?) 1907 13
65
BOWMAN Mary Leah (?) 1937 25
225
BOWNE Ellin Cox (?) 1913 32
145
BROADLEY Julia 1933 33
20
BRUCE Ellen 1928 4
2
BUCKLEY Elizabeth Caroline (?) 1912 20
105
BUNKER Ellen 1901 18
138
BUNKER Sarah 1924 18
138
BUNT Angelina (?) 1938 36
144
BURGESS Sarah 1933 29
27
BURNET Catherine (?) 1903 28
264
BURNEY Ellen 1919 41
115
BUTCHER Alma Ellen 1943 33
385
BUTTON Amelia 1906 15
141
BUTTON Louisa 1931 15
137
CADDELL Annie 1912 33
400
CARDALE Effie
17
183 SS
CARROLL Elizabeth Grace 1918 18
32
CATE Susan Sophia (?) 1902 31 A 133
CAVERHILL Christina Scott 1918 36
178
CAWOOD Susanna 1895 31 A 69
CHAPLIN Agnes Eleanor 1955 36
410
CHAPLIN Emily 1926 36
410
CHEGWIN Susan 1898 32
47
CLARK Jane 1913 24
243
CLARK Mary Ann 1929 48
213
COLE Fanny B
35
26
COLEMAN Catherine Jane 1916 36
173
COLEMAN Fanny Sophia 1920 36
475
COLLINS Mary Louisa (?) 1894 32
304
COLLINS Phoebe 1905 15
130
COLLINS Susan Phyllis (?) 1937 24
259
COMMONS Mary 1940 43
210
Community of the Sacred Name





CONNAL Margaret 1914 29
9
COOMBRIDGE Frances Elizabeth 1899 33
513
COPEMAN Hannah 1928 33
453
COWAN Henrietta Frances 1898 23
166
CRAIG Jane Victoria (?) 1920 36
176
CRICKMORE Emma 1925 29
72
CROCKETT Mary Alice 1942 29
300
CUNNINGTON Eveline
46
67
DALE Sarah 1904 29
67
DAVIDSON Isabella
31 A 151
DAY Grace 1939 34
170
DENNIS Francis Edith 1946 33
449
DICK Mary Ann 1935 36
77
DOWDALL Martha 1922 33
443
DOWLE Emma Ivy 1898 32
126
DRINKWATER Rosa Ann 1920 24
225
DYER Sarah Ann 1908 22
60
DYKES Susan 1913 n/a
71
ELLIS Rose 1916 47
17
ENGLAND Lucy Louisa 1943 35
213
ENGLAND Sarah Louisa 1918 35
212
FAWCETT Sarah 1898 18
71
FLAVELL Lucy 1910 35
131
FOREST Helen Dick 1908 18
120
FOWLER Sarah 1914 33
66
FRANCIS Alice Orpah 1942 22
127
GAPES Mary Elizabeth 1919 20
111
GILBERT Ada 1895 31 A 45
GLANVILLE Ann 1905 33
284
GOODISON Elizabeth 1893 32
325
GREAVES Mary Ann 1897 27
144
GREEN Elizabeth Louisa (?) 1939 36
258
GRIFFIN Susan 1931 36 A 74
GRIFFITHS Mary 1900 22
125
GRUBB Johanna Mitchell 1925 36 A 81
GUY Elizabeth (?) 1900 31 A 90
HANDLEY Alice (?) 1899 6
15
HARDING Dee H 1901 32
19
HARPER Amy 1915 24
327
HARRINGTON Jutta Emilie 1929 24
232
HARRIS Celia Ann 1909 33
242
HARRIS Margaret 1896 23
85
HARTSHORN Frances Matilda 1897 41
50
HARVEY Grace 1894 28
325
HARVEY Matilda 1908 33
183
HAYDON Jane (?) 1929 28
302
HEALY Harriet 1918 36
25
HEARD Harriet (?) 1904 16 A 34
HENLEY Maud(e) Emily (?) 1918 35
211
HENSLEY Ruby Eveline (?) 1909 25
208
HIGHSTED Jane 1918 34
32
HIRON Hannah (?) 1901 12
30
HODGSON Mary 1918 48
140
HOOKER Frances Ann 1902 33
423
HOWARD Charlotte 1894 31
40
HUDSON Emma 1900 29
229
HUMPHREYS Catherine 1898 18
43
HUTTON Ann Louisa 1897 31 A 196
IRVINE Fanny Ann 1898 29
42
ISHERWOOD Mrs G (need to confirm first name)




ISITT Agnes 1938 36
181
JACKSON Sarah (?) 1894 40
39
JAMES Florence Fanny 1937 27
55
JONES Harriet Charlotte (?) 1908 35
197
JONES Jane Gilmore 1919 24
56
JOWETT Helen 1918 36 A 72
JOYCE Emily 1908 15
216
JOYCE Maria 1902 41
44
JULIUS Churchill
11
4
KEAST Anne Symons (?) 1901 32
287
KEAST Lucy 1950 32
286
KEIGHLEY Mary (?) 1912 35
53
KEMP Amy (?) 1899 16 A 29
KENNELL Catherine 1901 10
37
KENT Sarah Jane (?) 1942 21
241
KERRIDGE Susan 1919 17
22
KESTEVEN Louisa Sarah 1898 32
74
KILBURN Jane 1907 33
210
KILLNER Jessie (?) 1921 36
104
KING Jane 1923 32
205
KING Margaret Jane (?) 1943 32
204
LAMB Mary 1898 28
112
LANCASTER Eurydice 1911 24
71
LANGLEY Elizabeth 1908 42
62
LEAVER Elizabeth 1897 18
33
LEE Jane 1924 35
191
LIESKE Harriett 1945 44
121
LINDNER Ruth 1940 47
342
LOCK Lucy 1918 36 A 21
LOGAN Margaret 1899 28
44
LOUGHNAN H H
40
142
LUCAS Augusta Christina 1948 32
389
MANN Caroline 1896 22
147
MANSELL Frances Ling 1918 48
136
MARRIOTT Fanny Matilda 1918 36 A 104
MARSHALL Agnes Jane 1948 29
494
MARTINDALE Jane 1894 29
77
MASSEY Elizabeth 1910 24
3
MATHER Rebecca 1911 41
98
McCREADY Jane 1913 30
293
McEWEN Elizabethr 1949 36
18
McGILLION Ellen 1920 37
254
McHARG Jane 1905 30
138
McHUGH Johanna 1909 42
77
McINTYRE Margaret Leighton 1923 29
71
McLEAN Matilda Maud 1941 28
324
McTAVISH Jessie Nicol 1898 29
452
MITCHELL Frances 1906 29
436
MOODY Ann 1894 31
64
MOSES Sarah 1920 28
29
MUNNINGS Emma 1927 32
85
MURRAY Mary May 1939 38
72
MUTER Katie 1906 18
256
NEWMAN Sarah 1920 6
19
NOLAN Catherine Maria 1903 41
15
O'BRIEN A B
40
4
OFFWOOD Susan 1904 35
76
PASCOE Annie Sarah 1906 13
67
PEACOCK Mary Ann 1914 24
194
PEMBERTON Selina 1916 32
268
PHILIPS Maria 1899 16 A 65
PIKE Maria Beckett 1905 31 A 161
POPPLEWELL Catherine Clara 1916 45
139
PRUDHOE Ann 1909 33
329
QUINN Mary Ann 1914 44
29
ROBERTS Ellen 1918 48
212
ROBINSON Alice Ambel 1899 7
18
RODGERS Sarah 1937 41
151
ROGERS Amelia 1896 32
172
ROGERS Julia 1918 36
200
RONALDS Laura Adila 1910 17
52
ROWLEY Elizabeth 1913 33
498
ROWLEY Mary Jane 1946 25
171
ROWNTREE Mary Ann 1937 32
151
RUNDLE Elizabeth Ann 1917 32
365
SALKELD Catherine 1925 33
244
SAMUELS Emily 1905 5
1 A
SAUNDERS Alfred 1905 32
198
SAVAGE Martha 1910 14
98
SCARF Mary 1929 46
174
SEFTON Ellen Margaret
16 A 3
SHANNON Margaret 1910 43
119
SHARLAND Mary Ann W 1904 10
38
SHAW Laura 1943 33
174
SHERRIN Agnes 1894 41
33
SHERRIS Suzanna 1917 35
304
SHOOLBRAID Ann 1925 29
375
SIMMONS Furisiman 1907 30
58
SMITH Eleanor Pheobe 1913 32
94
SMITH Eleanor Sarah Bruce 1917 35
214
SMITH Isabella Eugene 1940 36 A 138
SNOOK Frances Sophia 1937 23 A 134
SOANES Sarah 1920 31
78
SOMMERS Hannah 1916 47
42
SPENSLEY Agnes G 1900 28
434
STEERE Louisa 1909 15
68
STEVEN Alice 1910 33
130
STUBBS Georgina 1922 18
49
STURGESS Susannah Mary Ann 1917 46
232
TANNER Frances Mary 1918 48
120
TAYLOR Ada Sinclair 1914 8
25
TAYLOR Catherine 1918 36 A 50
TAYLOR Susannah 1894 23 A 14
THOMAS Matilda Sarah 1919 36 A 107
THOMSON Fanny 1925 7
29
TOMLINE Rhoda Lavinia 1930 2
8
TREVELLA Charlotte 1898 32
56
TURVEY Kate Eliza 1932 28
282
VIRTUE Mary Ann 1946 33
91
WALLIS Eliza 1914 33
234
WARDELL Mary 1908 35
65
WAY Hannah 1912 24
154
WEIR Agnes Johanna 1941 48
146
WEST Caroline Mary 1929 28
164
WHEELER Emily 1929 18
181
WIDDOWSON Mrs G (Ann?) 1900 32
185
WIGZELL Hannah 1894 31
18
WIGZELL Helen Louisa 1931 31
19
WILLIAMS Lily Elizabeth 1904 29
89
WILSON Alice Sarah 1935 18
267
WILSON Clara Henrietta 1941 12
17
WOODFORD Emilia Caroline 1895 31 A 44
WYLIE Henrietta 1935 32
175
McSWEENEY Margaret 1942 39
66

 

New Zealand Women Getting The Vote

New Zealanders are reminded they belong to the "first self-governing country to legislate for universal female franchise." (Coney, 1993) every time they see the portrait of Kate SHEPPARD on the NZ$10 note.  Click here for further information about Kate SHEPPARD.

Maybe these days, and over 120 years on, it is a challenge for us to imagine a time in NZ when girls did not have secondary education (first allowed in 1871), free primary education (allowed from 1877), or allowed to graduate from University (1877) and were regarded for purposes of citizenship as having the same decision making ability "as children, lunatics and criminals."  Children were legally their father's property, women their husband's.  Women could not vote, but women in business employed men - who legally could.

The early settlement of New Zealand was mainly by men; those on the whaling ships and subsequenty those drawn to the Otago goldfields.  SAUNDERS was quoted by Kate Sheppard as calling them "scenes of almost inhumane vice and wickedness" (ed Mears, p.220).  The abuse of alcohol was a huge social problem of the time, and those recognising that were calling for the prohibition (banning) of alcohol following the work of the temperence (alcohol-free society) groups first established in the United States and England.  To this end it was also believed that if women were allowed to vote, the vote for prohibition would be significantly increased as well as there being a pressure to "clean up" the politics of the time.

Although women had the vote on some small islands and territories as early as 1838, the first public advocate for votes for women in New Zealand is regarded as Mary Ann MULLER of Nelson who, from 1869 wrote under the pen name of "Femina".  Despite constant campaigning by HALL and SAUNDERS, the proposal for women to receive the vote was dismissed on many grounds.  Two petitions supporting a woman's right to vote were submitted to parliament during 1887 without effect, leading Kate SHEPPARD to publish "Ten Reasons Why the Women of New Zealand Should Vote" which was sent to all the politicians of the day who, of course, were all male.

It took a further 6 years of campaigning and disappointments for the women of New Zealand to get the vote, the achievement on 19th September 1893 being "hailed internationally as a signal victory in the world-wide struggle for electoral rights for women", (Coney, 1993).  Linwood Cemetery had been open for 9 years by this time. Only NZ, Australia, Finland and Norway and 11 States of America had granted women the right to vote by the First World War (1914-1918).

Linwood Cemetery has a strong connection with the suffrage movement.  Kate SHEPPARD and most of her family are buried in Addington Cemetery, but members of her second husband's family, the LOVELL-SMITHs are interred in Block 32 Plot 96.  Kate married William Sidney LOVELL- SMITH in 1925 when she was 78.  He was a long time friend and campaigned alongside her.

Along the main path to the PEACOCK Mausoleum at Block 32 Plot 198, there is a double plot with an imposing black headstone.  It is eye-catching for it's inscription,

" A cause might be despised, obscure,

rejected, He not only helped it all the

same he helped it all the more, and in

the dark, and stormy days of unfriendly

truth he was always in the front."

It is the burial place of Alfred SAUNDERS (1820-1905) an early pioneer, who arrived in NZ in 1844, and subsequently became a local politician and who, along with Sir John HALL of Christchurch, at every opportunity championed women getting the vote.  SAUNDERS served on the Nelson Provincial Council in 1855 then, when the political structure of New Zealand changed, became the area's local Member of Parliament (MP).  He had moved to Christchurch by 1872 and become the MP for Cheviot, Lincoln & Selwyn also serving on the House of Representatives.   SAUNDERS was a close friend of Walter SHEPPARD who was on the Christchurch City Council as early as 1868.  Walter married Kate MALCOLM on 21st July 1871.  It is likely that SAUNDERS empassioned Kate in his cause.

SAUNDERS was noted as "... strenuous, imbued with a great public spirit, and ever anxious to see our political and social life lived on right lines..." (Sir Robert Stout quoted in Tales of a Pioneer p224).  In a paper he wrote in 1886 (only 2 years after Linwood Cemetery opened) SAUNDERS summed up his opinion;


"But what can we say of the unqualified assertion that 'marriage is to a woman what a profession is to a man?' We need not enlarge upon, or even point out the very obvious fact that all women are not married, nor the equally obvious one that a considerable proportion of those that are would have been much better off in some other position of life. We have not the slightest wish to prevent women from marrying; but we cannot entirely ignore the education and happiness of those who may not desire, or may not be called on, to fill that station in life." ..."Where all the essential conditions of mutual happiness do not present themselves, woman is often the chief sufferer, and, as she values her own peace of mind, we would counsel her to aim so to shape her course in life that she may never be compelled, as a mater of convenience, to a friendless, joyless, heartless union for life. We need not descend to argue that she can be happy and useful in other walks of life...."
..."We often hear from them (men) that good wives and mothers are a very valuable and sometimes scarce commodity. We find no fault with them for entertaining or even for expressing such opinion; but, as good husbands and fathers are, in some countries, quite as scarce as good wives and mothers, we cannot wish to see women cut off from every other resource and compelled to look on marriage as their only profession."

SAUNDERS wrote a History of New Zealand based on his personal memories which was published in 1898 the same year of his wife's death aged 69.  He died 7 years later in 1905 aged 85 years.

Sources

Greenaway, Richard L N,  Linwood Cemetery Tour Guide, CCC

Saunders, Alfred; Tales of a Pioneer; Cadsonbury Publications; Christchurch;2003. (ed. Lyn Meares) first published 1927 by L M Isitt Ltd. ISBN 1-877151-87-4 (pages 190 - 223)

Coney, Sandra; Standing In The Sunshine; A History of New Zealand Women Since They Won the Vote; Penguin Books; Auckland; 1993.

Regional Women's Decade Committee 1975-1985; Canterbury Women Since 1893; Pegasus Press; Christchurch; 1979

© Friends of Linwood Cemetery Charitable Trust

Page created 1st March 2015  and reviewed 6th September 2018 by Alexandra

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The Suffrage Project - Linwood Cemetery


City:Christchurch
Previous name :Corporation Cemetery
Suburb :Bromley